BAD SCHOLARSHIP, WEIRD BELIEFS AND STRANGELY UNEXPLORED AREAS OF RESEARCH

Identifying strangely neglected areas of research, understanding why orthodox research scholarship and 'knowledge' becomes lopsided, revealing and understanding the reasons for the creation, dissemination and widespread belief in academic and policy oriented research frauds, lies, deceptions, hoaxes, fallacies, myths, braced myths, errors and irrational policymaking.

Saturday, 25 March 2017

VAM Infects Donald Trump

Desspite research, there is currently not a shred of scientific evidence for any causal relationship between infant vaccinations and autism. Any notion that such a thing might exist originated in an article in the Lancet in 1998. That article, written by Andrew Wakefield and several colleagues, was later retracted for science fraud. Here..

Robert De Niro who has a son with autism once went on TV to lobby for more research into the possible causal effects of vaccinations on autism. Clearly, the Wakefield article set an insidious meme lose in the world: the 'Vaccine Autism Meme' (VAM). De Niro caught it. His mind was contaminated with it. Perhaps it still is. You can go straight to the TV interview HERE.

Today, the brain of the President of the United States of America is proven to be infected with VAM. The hard evidence is provided by way of his own Tweets. The evidence has been safely archived and cited for posterity at my blog site: "The Veracity Institute" HERE.

Back in the UK, where this whole thing started, I have been commissioned by the Editor of the highly respected and influential HealthWatch Magazine to write a brief article on the subject of what we know and don't know about the impact of politicians personally broadcasting information on health issues - including vaccination coverage in the USA and elsewhere in the world. The article is to be co-authored with Professor Matt Henn - an expert on politics, and Linda Gibson, an expert on public health. We propose in our forthcoming article that a research project should be commissioned to look in greater depth at this one particular issue.

HealthWatch first came to hear of my research into science myths via earlier work published in the Internet Journal of Criminology and  on Best Thinking. If you use Google as your browser, an article they commissioned me t write on the Spinach myth can be read HERE.

When our VAM article is published I will write a blog - with a link to it.

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